Cowing & Co 1859

CITIZEN #1.
from Handtub Junction, USA

1859 The handtub is built by Cowing & Co. of Seneca Falls, New York.

1859-68? The handtub is delivered to Glen Falls, N.Y., then sold to Richmond, VA, and later to Augusta, GA. Survived the Civil War as a "Confederate Engine."

1868 The handtub is sold to Union Springs, Alabama for the sum of $1800.

1897 October - The handtub is sold to Randolph, Massachusetts Volunteer Fireman’s Association for $700 & name changed to "ALABAMA COON", with $3000 worth of restoration.


Alabama Coon - c1900

1901 sold to Stoughton, Massachusetts for $410. Interior pump repaired with a Button & Co. pump.

1905 N.E. League Champ as CITIZEN #1. Citizen would win the “Torch Trophy” at Manchester, N.H.

1910 N.E. League Champ as Alabama Coon.

late 1940's Alabama Coon was sold to Ipswich, Massachusetts, and name changed back to CITIZEN #1.

1953 Mustered as Alabama Coon through the muster season.

1954 It was changed back to it's original name Citizen #1.

1955-68 Engine ending up in Freedom Land, NY. then went to the Roth Steel Co., of Syracuse, NY.

1969 John W. Lowe of Sonora brought her West for the first time and operated the pumper under the banner of the Standard Fire Brigade.

1970, 71, 72 Grand Champion in Standard, CA. Pickering Fire Brigade.

1975 John W. Lowe loans the Citizen to Columbia State Historic Park for safe keeping.

2007 Citizen was moved to the State Street Firehouse.

2011 May - Citizen is currently scheduled to move to her new home, the Fire Museum of Syracuse in Syracuse, New York.

Citizen #1 - Columbia 2007

Most of the information for the above historical sketch came form the publication entitled "Cowing & Co. A story of their Fire Engines" published by the Seneca Falls Historical Society. This publication is available for purchase in the HJUSA General Store.



More information on handtubs

This page is created for the benefit of the public by
Columbia Booksellers & Stationers
22725 Main Street, Columbia Cal'a, 95310-9401


A WORK IN PROGRESS,
created for the visitors to the Columbia State Historic park.
© Columbia State Historic Park & Floyd D. P. Øydegaard.